Author: Haley G

Egermann Woods

One of the few remaining pre-settlement oak forests in DuPage County is in Egermann Woods Preserve. Additionally, several ephemeral ponds and 15 acres of reforested native trees and plants are contained in the preserve, making it a valuable habitat for amphibians, birds, and other wildlife species. While this preserve is relatively undeveloped, there is a mowed turf trail which meanders for 1.3 miles through the preserve. The trail can be used by hikers, bicyclists, horseback riders, cross-country skiers and joggers. No parking is available.

Volunteer Opportunities

Working under the direction of the Office of Natural Resources, volunteer site stewards and “Volunteer Restoration Workday” participants help to monitor and manage the large oak woodland that makes up this preserve. For information on volunteer opportunities at Egermann Woods and other forest preserves, visit the Natural Resource Management volunteer page, or contact Volunteer Services at (630) 933-7681 or volunteer@dupageforest.org.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or
TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

Danada

Danada has a rich history as the former home of Daniel and Ada Rice, and Kentucky Derby winner Lucky Debonair. Today, the preserve is the home of Danada Equestrian Center, which is surrounded by 825 acres of rolling terrain that encompass wetlands, woodlands and prairies.

A large wetland complex interspersed with fields is located in the area west of Naperville Road. Although the natural prairie is gone, a 35-acre region has been the target of intensive restoration efforts that have yielded a healthy, restored prairie. This ecosystem complex attracts a variety of wildlife, including waterfowl, grassland birds, and a heron rookery.

The DuPage Forest Preserve District’s headquarters building, which was designed to blend in with the natural surroundings, is located within the Danada Forest Preserve on the west side of Naperville Road.

Recreation

Fishing

The 36-acre Rice Lake has a maximum depth of 22 feet, with a fluctuating water level of as much as six feet. Fisheries management of this valuable flood-control area includes stocking. Parking is available in the main parking lot. All persons 16 and older (except legally disabled persons) are required to have in their possession a valid Illinois sport fishing license. All anglers must follow District and state regulations.

Picnicking

Visitors will find picnic tables near the main barn, the fire circle, and the parking lot.

Trails

Nearly three miles of multipurpose trails wind through the preserve’s prairie, woodland, and marsh habitats and connect with the Regional Trail (linking four other preserves), providing a scenic excursion for hikers, joggers, bicyclists, equestrians and cross-country skiers. Behind the main barn is a double-looped nature trail through an oak savanna with many native wildflowers. When conditions permit, trails are groomed for classical and skate-style cross-country skiing. Horseback riders are asked to restrain their mounts when riding through woods, through the Naperville Road underpass, or around sharp corners to avoid confronting less-visible trail users.

Education

The Danada Equestrian Center welcomes visitors of all ages, offering educational and recreational programs rooted in Danada’s unique equine heritage. The center offers group, private and semi-private lessons, horsemanship clinics, group tours, summer camp and group trail rides. In addition, the center hosts the annual Danada Fall Festival.

The Danada Model Farm preserves the agricultural history of DuPage County through 1950s farm machinery and agricultural practices. The farm is operated by the Danada Model Farm volunteers, who provide fall harvest tours of the farm. Fall harvest tours are best suited for first through third graders, and young scout groups.

For more information on Equestrian Center, call (630) 668-6012. To schedule a fall harvest tour of Danada Model Farm, call (630) 668-5392.

Danada House

The 19-room Danada House, the former residence of Daniel and Ada Rice, is available for formal receptions, corporate events, educational seminars, meetings, parties and other functions. The dining room, library, living room, and two porches can accommodate up to 70 people. The Atrium comfortably seats up to 250 guests and features large windows that connect visitors to the surrounding landscape. Danada House is owned by the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County and is operated by the Friends of Danada, a not-for-profit organization. For more information, see www.danadahouse.com, or call (630) 668-5392.

The historic Rice family racetrack is available for special events. The one-quarter mile track is used for walk-a-thons, running events and other charity events. For more information, contact Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248.

Volunteering

The Danada Equestrian Center is one of six District Educaiton Centers that provides year-round volunteer opportunities. Those interested in volunteering at Danada Equestrian Center (assisting with horse-care, guiding tours, helping with events such as the Danada Fall Festival) should contact the District’s Volunteer Services Office at (630) 933-7681 or view the Volunteer Opportunities page for more information.

Working with the Office of Natural Resources, volunteer site stewards and “Volunteer Restoration Workday” participants help to monitor and manage the restored prairie on the west side of Naperville Road and the mature oak grove adjacent to the Danada Equestrian Center. For information on volunteer opportunities at Danada and other forest preserves, visit the Natural Resource Management volunteer page, or contact Volunteer Services at (630) 933-7681 or volunteer@dupageforest.org.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

 

Cricket Creek

By creating the 208-acre Cricket Creek Forest Preserve in Addison, the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County transformed a flood-prone housing development into a beautiful forest preserve for all to enjoy. The preserve also contains the county’s first wetland mitigation bank, a restoration site funded by developers to replace previously destroyed wetlands. The District hope to restore and reintroduce wetland species of plant and wildlife into the preserves, such as cattails and leopard frogs.

Recreation

Picnicking

Picnickers can reserve the 50-person shelter near the main parking lot through Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248 but must do so at least three business days before their visit. Cricket Creek has a nonreservable picnic area, too.

Ground fires are prohibited, but visitors may bring their own grills and use the on-site hot-coal disposal containers. For everyone’s convenience, Cricket Creek offers a water pump and restrooms with pit toilets.

Trails

Trails wind through the preserve and around the lakes and are ideal for hiking, biking, jogging and cross-country skiing.

Fishing

There are three shallow lakes at Cricket Creek, each with largemouth bass, crappie, catfish, sunfish, and bluegill. The 9-acre Green Lake has a maximum depth of 10 feet. The 3-acre Stonewort Pond and 5-acre Riverbend Pond have maximum depths of 9 feet. Anglers are asked to fish Stonewort Pond if visitors with model boats are using Riverbend.

Anglers 16 and older who are not legally disabled must have valid Illinois sport fishing licenses in their possession. All anglers must follow all District and state regulations.

Dogs

Dogs are welcome at Cricket Creek but must be on leashes no greater than 10 feet in length.

Model Boating

Riverbend Pond is the Forest Preserve District’s only model-boating lake. Operators must have valid IMPBA cards and District permits in their possession and may only use Riverbend Pond.

Annual and daily permits are available through Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248 weekdays between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Senior citizens are entitled to one free annual permit per calendar year.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

 

Churchill Woods

Although it’s one of the county’s smaller forest preserves, the 264-acre Churchill Woods Forest Preserve in Glen Ellyn is home to an impressive range of habitats.

Babcock Grove, a savanna within the preserve, surrounds visitors with bur oak, white oak and black maple trees. This open woodland, which runs along both sides of St. Charles Road, is named for brothers Ralph and Morgan Babcock, two of the county’s first settlers of European descent.

Some of the grove’s white oaks date back to the 1830s, a time when settlers left seedlings untouched as they logged mature oaks for new plank roads. Some say Winslow Churchill complained about the noise from the horse-drawn traffic that clattered over the planks on St. Charles Road, which kept him awake at night. Within Babcock Grove, wildflower enthusiasts can look for a variety of interesting species, including Dutchman’s breeches, wild strawberry, yellow touch-me-not, with its long-seeded pods that spring open when touched, and hairy hog peanut, a legume with peanut-like nodules that grows in a former grazing area for hogs.

Churchill Prairie Nature Preserve contains one of the county’s few remaining native prairies. Home to several state-endangered and threatened species, the prairie is located in a sand and gravel outwash plain swale of the DuPage River Valley that is embedded in the surrounding Valparaiso moraine. It is the second largest native prairie in the county, with West Chicago Prairie Nature Preserve being the largest.

District staff and Natural Resource Management volunteers spend countless hours each year restoring this rare habitat, which the state designated as an Illinois Nature Preserve in 1992. Using prescription fires, brush clearing, seed planting and other restoration techniques, crews encourage the growth of native species.

Preserve History

The 1833 Treaty of Chicago provided for the United States’ acquisition and settlement of the last remaining American Indian land in Illinois, including land that would eventually become DuPage County. The treaty required all American Indians to resettle west of the Mississippi River over the next three years. During this time, a community of about 500 Potawatomi lived in present-day Churchill Woods as they waited for the government to send them west.

In 1834, Winslow and Mercy Churchill, who left Syracuse, N.Y., in search of rich farmland after their own farm was purchased for the Erie Canal, settled on the western edge of today’s Churchill Woods Forest Preserve. The Churchills became prosperous farmers who earned a prominent reputation among the citizens of developing Glen Ellyn and Lombard as well as Milton Township, which they helped to establish. Their combined claims stretched from present-day Route 53 on the east, North Avenue on the north, Main Street in Glen Ellyn on the west and Crescent Boulevard on the south — all bought for $1.25 an acre.

The Forest Preserve District acquired the first portion of Churchill Woods from Eliza Churchill in 1935. Its final significant acquisition, which included the 65-acre prairie on the north side of St. Charles Road, was in 1968.

Recreation

Trails

The 0.6-mile Regional Trail offers hiking, biking and bird-watching opportunities year-round. In winter snows add cross-country skiing to the lineup. Because the trail runs through the Churchill Prairie Nature Preserve, bicycles, horses and pets must remain on the trail at all times.

Picnicking

Churchill Woods has long been a favorite DuPage County picnic spot with several scenic sites along the river. Groups can reserve the shelter or one of two open picnic areas through Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248 but must do so at least three business days before their visit.

Ground fires are not allowed, but visitors can bring their own grills and use the on-site hot-coal disposal containers. For everyone’s convenience, restrooms with pit toilets are located throughout the preserve.

Fishing

A series of flagstone terraces offers anglers improved access to the East Branch of the DuPage River as they fish for bluegill, carp, crappie, sunfish and largemouth bass. Other shoreline improvements have included the addition of emergent native vegetation along shallower areas of the river and the installation of a 10-foot-wide pedestrian bridge between the west and central picnic areas and an island.

Anglers 16 or older who are not legally disabled must carry valid Illinois sport fishing licenses, and all anglers must follow all District and state regulations.

Youth-Group Campground

Each of Churchill Woods’ two wooded youth-group campsites has picnic tables and a fire ring and is near restrooms with pit toilets, drinking water, trash and recycling containers, and firewood. As part of Districtwide efforts to help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer, outside firewood is not allowed.

Open year-round, these camping areas are set aside for use by youth groups. The District defines youth groups as recognized, nonprofit organizations. Only members of these groups, with their accompanying leaders, may camp in these areas. Camping permits and adult supervision of one leader over 21 years of age for every 10 children are mandatory for campsite use. Groups can reserve sites through Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248 but must do so at least three business days in advance.

Volunteer Opportunities

Working under the direction of the Office of Natural Resources, volunteer site stewards and “Volunteer Restoration Workday” participants help to monitor and manage the Churchill Prairie Nature Preserve and the special woodland adjacent to the Prairie Path that rests on a kame, a hill shaped by glacial meltwaters. For information on volunteer opportunities at Churchill Woods and other forest preserves, visit the Natural Resource Management volunteer page, or contact Volunteer Services at (630) 933-7681 or volunteer@dupageforest.org.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

Blackwell

Visitors hiking through Blackwell Forest Preserve in Warrenville walk on land that the retreating Wisconsin Glacier shaped 12,000 to 15,000 years ago. In fact, the glacier’s meltwaters left behind much of the soil that covers DuPage County today. After the glacier’s retreat, savannas with widely spaced oak trees formed on the higher ground while the lower-lying ground became home to marsh and prairie plants. In 1977, Blackwell made paleontological history when District employees working at McKee Marsh uncovered the 13,000-year-old skeleton of a woolly mammoth, one of the oldest finds of its kind in northeastern Illinois.

In the 1830s, Erastus Gary, one of Winfield Township’s first settlers and a founder of Gary, Ind., made his home on the land that is now Blackwell Forest Preserve. There, he operated a grist mill — Gary’s Mill — east of the West Branch of the DuPage River. 130 years later, the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County purchased the land and named the new preserve for Roy C. Blackwell, a former District president.

The Forest Preserve District concluded that it could convert a quarry on the south side of the preserve into a multiuse area that would both retain stormwater and offer visitors a variety of recreational activities. The quarry became Silver Lake. Authorities later chose Blackwell to be the site of a new county landfill. The resulting Mount Hoy operated from 1965 to 1973 and provided valuable knowledge in managing solid waste. Today, Mount Hoy serves as a scenic overlook and popular birding site as well as a winter tubing hill.

Recreation

Trails

Hikers, bicyclers, horseback riders and cross-country skiers can enjoy more than 6 miles of turf and limestone trails, including a convenient route to the Illinois Prairie Path. Trails around the McKee Marsh area feature two observation decks, a bird blind, and signs that describe the history and ecological significance of the marsh.
Horseback riders should park their trailers at the McKee Marsh lot on Mack Road and should not ride in developed recreational areas, such as picnic areas and campgrounds.

When conditions permit, rangers groom trails for cross-country skiing. Classical cross-country skiers should use the outside of the trail, leaving the inside area for freestyle skiers and other trail users.

Picnicking

Ample picnic sites line the shores of Silver Lake. Picnickers can reserve the Hawthorne Grove picnic area and the preserve’s four picnic shelters by calling Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248 but must do so at least three business days before their visit.

Ground fires are not allowed, but visitors can bring their own grills and use the on-site hot-coal disposal containers. For everyone’s convenience, Blackwell offers several restrooms with pit toilets; flush toilets are located near the north shelter, and a portable toilet is near the off-leash dog area.

Fishing

The 62-acre Silver Lake, the site of the District’s annual Just for Kids Fishing Derby in June, features bluegill, catfish, crappie, largemouth bass, northern pike, rainbow trout and walleye. Anglers can access the lake via two fishing piers but may not fish from the boat docks or boat-launch area. Blackwell’s White Pine Pond and Sand Pond feature bluegill, channel catfish and largemouth bass.

The Forest Preserve District allows ice fishing at Blackwell at the angler’s own risk; rangers do not monitor ice conditions. As a guideline, not a guarantee, a minimum of 4 inches of ice is recommended for any ice activity.
Anglers 16 or older who are not legally disabled must carry valid Illinois sport fishing licenses. They also need to carry Inland Trout Stamps in order to take trout from District lakes. Anglers must follow all state and District regulations.

Boating

Federal and state regulations require that watercraft contain one wearable, well-fitting, Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device for each member on board and that children under 13 wear their PFDs at all times. In addition, District regulations require that all individuals, regardless of age, must wear PFDs when in private kayaks or canoes or any District-rented watercraft.

Private Watercraft

At Silver Lake, visitors can bring their own nongasoline-powered watercraft up to 20 feet in length including boats, sailboats, canoes, kayaks and multichambered inflatables with factory-installed hardened floors and transoms. Watercraft must be registered with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and have a District private-boating permit. Boaters can purchase daily and annual permits at the boat-rental area and at Forest Preserve District headquarters. A steel lockbox is available at Blackwell to collect daily permit fees.

A canoe launch on the south side of Mack Road offers free access to the West Branch of the DuPage River. However, ongoing work to clean up and restore habitat along the river will make sections downstream impassable during the spring, summer and fall. As a result, the launch will be open only as a take-out site for paddlers from the north. The District will post warning signs at the launch during these times.

Rentals

Visitors can rent canoes, kayaks, rowboats, and boats with electric trolling motors for use on Silver Lake by the hour or the day at Blackwell’s boat-rental area. Visitors can provide their own electric trolling motors for use on District boats, but the District does not provide motors for use on private boats. Oars, paddles and personal flotation devices are provided for rentals only and cannot be rented separately for use in private watercraft.

The boat-rental facility is open weekends from the beginning of April through May from 8 a.m. until 6.30 p.m. (the last boat rental of the day is at 5:30 p.m.). From Memorial Day through Labor Day, it is also open Mondays through Fridays from 11 a.m. until 6:30 p.m. (the last boat rental of the day is at 5:30 p.m.). Between Labor Day and the end of September, the facility is open only on weekends from 8 a.m. through 5:30 p.m. (the last boat rental of the day is at 4:30 p.m.).

Family Camping

There are 62 wooded and semiwooded family campsites at Blackwell. Each includes a gravel parking pad, fire ring and picnic table and is within easy walking distance of restrooms with pit toilets, drinking water, and trash and recycling containers. There are sites suitable for tents (many with crushed-rock tent pads), trailers and motor homes; all have electricity, but none have sewage or water hookups. A shower house with restrooms with flush toilets, a dump station and firewood are available near the campground office. Firewood is $5 a bundle; as part of Districtwide efforts to help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer, outside firewood is not allowed.

The campground is open from May through September on Friday and Saturday nights with additional nights during holiday weeks. Campers interested in reserving a site should call Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248; advanced reservations are accepted up to three business days prior to the campers’ stay.

Youth-Group Camping

Each of Blackwell’s 12 semiwooded youth-group campsites can accommodate up to 25 campers and has its own picnic tables and fire ring. The sites are close to trails, lakes and an open play field as well as restrooms with pit toilets, drinking water, trash and recycling containers, and firewood. As part of Districtwide efforts to help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer, outside firewood is not allowed.

Open year-round, these camping areas are set aside for use by youth groups. The District defines youth groups as recognized, nonprofit organizations. Only members of these groups, with their accompanying leaders, may camp in these areas. Camping permits and adult supervision of one leader over 21 years of age for every 10 children are mandatory for campsite use. Groups can reserve sites through Visitor Services at (630) 933-7248 but must do so at least three business days in advance.

Archery Range

The archery area at Blackwell features three ranges. The beginner range is enclosed on three sides with safety netting and has eight lanes and eight standard targets up to 25 yards. The advanced range has 11 lanes and 11 standard FITA targets up to 90 meters. The interactive range has nine lanes and 15 two-dimensional targets up to 60 yards. Each range has bow racks and limestone shooting lines with overshot and clear zones. All three share a common spectator area.

The range opens one hour after sunrise except on Wednesdays, when it opens at 10 a.m. after routine maintenance; it closes daily at sunset. Archers do not need permits or have an associated fee. For the safety and enjoyment of all forest preserve visitors, archers must follow all rules and regulations, which are on display at the range. When open, the boat-rental area at Blackwell sells Tyvek targets for $6.50 each.

Off-Leash Dog Area

Dogs with valid Forest Preserve District permits can enjoy Blackwell’s fully fenced off-leash area, which is located on the south side of Mack Road. Rules for the area are posted at the preserve. Owners must have their dogs’ permits in their possession when in the off-leash area; dogs must be leashed in all other areas of the preserve. The area is open during regular preserve hours; it is closed on Mondays until 9 a.m. for routine maintenance. Purchase a permit online or call Visitor Services Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. at (630) 933-7248.

Compass Course

The Blackwell compass course on Mount Hoy challenges users to find their way through the outdoors with the aid of this classic navigational tool. Visitors may reserve supplies for the course by calling 630-933-7248.

Winter Activities

Tubing fans can take a thrilling ride down Mount Hoy when 3 or more inches of snow covers the hill. District inner tubes are the only devices that may be used on Mount Hoy and can only be rented on weekends and school holidays December through February at the base of the hill. With the exception of the Mount Hoy area, sledding is allowed at Blackwell at the user’s own risk.

When snow conditions allow, dog sledders can use the Regional, Bobolink and connector trails through the McKee Marsh area north of Mack Road. During the rest of the year, mushers can use wheeled training carts up to 4 feet wide on every trail except the Egret Trail. For the safety of other visitors and the protection of the county’s natural resources, mushers must stay on the trails and travel in a controlled, safe manner.

Volunteer Opportunities

Working under the direction of the Office of Natural Resources, volunteer site stewards and “Volunteer Restoration Workday” participants help to monitor and manage the special woodland west of Silver Lake that rests on a kame, a hill shaped by glacial meltwaters. For information on volunteer opportunities at Blackwell and other forest preserves, visit the Natural Resource Management volunteer page, or contact Volunteer Services at (630) 933-7681 or volunteer@dupageforest.org.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or
TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

 

Big Woods

Big Woods currently stands as an undeveloped, natural area comprised of open fields, natural wooded areas, restored wetlands, and ponds. Indian Creek runs through the preserve, and Poss Lake offers fishing opportunities. It also is home to numerous waterfowl and fishing bird species such as mallards, Canada Geese, great blue herons, great egrets, and hooded mergansers. Migratory species such as Sandhill Cranes have also been spotted. Big Woods is adjacent to the Batavia Spur of the Illinois Prairie Path.

Recreation

Anglers can try their luck fishing at nine-acre Poss Lake. All persons 16 and older (except legally disabled persons) are required to have in their possession a valid Illinois sport fishing license. All anglers must follow District and state regulations.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or
TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

 

East Branch

The 525-acre East Branch Forest Preserve in Glendale Heights is largely a natural wetland along the East Branch of the DuPage River with lakes, marshes and wildlife habitats. It is an excellent place to observe grassland birds, shorebirds, and waterfowl, including spring and fall migrants.

In addition to recreational opportunities, the preserve provides valuable benefits to the community in the form of storm water control and improved water quality. One 0.8-mile trail and several unmarked footpaths allow visitors to observe everything from white-tailed deer and coyotes to great blue herons, sandhill cranes, and migrant waterfowl.

Recreation

Picnicking

A picnic area is located at the Glen Ellyn Road entrance. Ground fires are prohibited, but visitors may bring their own grills and use the on-site hot-coal disposal containers. For everyone’s convenience, East Branch offers portable toilets near both parking lots.

Fishing

The 15-acre Rush Lake has a maximum depth of 20 feet with little vegetation and steep gravel shores. The 5-acre Sunfish Pond has a maximum depth of 25 feet. Both feature largemouth bass, channel catfish, crappie and bluegill. Carp and bullheads also live in Rush Lake’s waters.

For those who would rather fish moving waters, the East Branch of the DuPage River winds through the preserve and offers anglers largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie, channel and flathead catfish, and northern pike. Anglers should note that fishing is not allowed in the off-leash dog area.

Anglers 16 and older who are not legally disabled must have valid Illinois sport fishing licenses in their possession. All anglers must follow all District and state regulations.

Off-Leash Dog Area

Dogs with valid Forest Preserve District permits can enjoy East Branch’s unfenced off-leash area at the Swift Road parking lot. Rules for the area are posted at the preserve. when in the off-leash area; dogs must be leashed in all other areas of the preserve. The area is open during regular preserve hours; it is closed on Mondays until 9 a.m. for routine maintenance. Purchase a permit online or call Visitor Services Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. at (630) 933-7248.

Accessibility

The Forest Preserve District of DuPage County is committed to making its facilities accessible to all visitors. For special accessibility needs or concerns, please contact the District’s ADA coordinator at (630) 933-7683 or
TTY (800) 526-0857 at least three business days in advance of your visit.

 

 

Intro to Prescription Burns

Come to Churchill Woods to learn about the benefits of prescription burns and how and why the Forest Preserve District uses them. See a burn in progress, too, weather permitting. All ages; under 18 with an adult. Free. Register online here or call (630) 933-7248.

Forest Fitness Walk

Visit Greene Valley and experience the wonders of nature with a ranger and naturalist, and get some healthy exercise on these brisk walks that increase in distance every week. Ages 18 and up. $4 per person in advance, $6 at the walk. Register online here or call (630)850-8110.